The 6 Best Miso Substitutes

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Not everyone has miso on hand at all times, particularly if you don’t make Japanese food on a daily basis. This ingredient is popular in Japan and has a distinct taste that is difficult to duplicate.

However, there are a few flavors and components that are similar to the properties of genuine miso. If you’re making a recipe that calls for miso but don’t have any on hand, try one of the alternatives below to make a tasty dinner without it.

Miso, like soy sauce, is a fermented condiment made from soybeans. Salts and other grains are also often included. There are several miso variants, each with its own distinct color and taste intensity.

Most miso includes grains, however there are a few exceptions that are excellent for gluten-free diets. Some are also soy-free, which is unusual for this component. Miso may be made at home, although there are various alternatives available in the store.

How healthy (or unhealthy) is it?

Miso is low in calories and strong in protein, with an umami taste that complements a wide range of meals. It also contains a lot of minerals and a lot of folic acid, B vitamins, vitamin E, and vitamin K.

Miso is a fermented substance that contains helpful bacteria for the stomach, which may help you remain happy and healthy. Overall, miso is a relatively nutritious food that may help you keep in shape when used in recipes.

Nutritional Breakdown

Miso

Amount (per 100 g)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

43 g

2%

Total fat

6 g

7%

Saturated fat

1 g

7%

Cholesterol

0

0%

Protein

13 g

25%

Salt

3728 mg

196%

Carbohydrates

25 g

9%

Calcium

57 mg

6%

Iron

2 mg

11%

Potassium

210 mg

5%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)

What recipes are miso used in?

Miso may be used in a variety of dishes, some of which may surprise you. Miso may be used to salad dressings and a variety of soups to enhance flavor.

It may be used to prepare marinades for meats and vegetables, as well as to season stir-fry dishes. Miso may be used to make a variety of sauces, as well as to give depth of flavor to onions on hamburgers or vegan equivalents to them.

Why do we need miso substitutes?

Because most people do not have miso on hand, it is typical to need a replacement when preparing a recipe that calls for it. There may also be times when you want to experiment with a dish and wish to use a miso alternative.

Those following a soy-free or gluten-free diet will also wish to avoid most kinds of miso. Choosing a substitute for such components will guarantee that you can enjoy the cuisine you are preparing.

Note:

= vegan


1. Soy saucešŸŒ±

Marinades, sauces, stews, noodles, and chicken are the best applications.

Soy sauce and miso are similar in that both are created from fermented substances. This suggests they have certain taste traits in common. Soy sauce is a delicious condiment produced from soybeans and white rice.

It is also one of the most popular soy products worldwide. This sauce has been around for over a thousand years and is still popular today.

Advantages

Soy sauce has no animal components, making it ideal for vegetarians and vegans. While some miso alternatives may not include soy, soy does provide the finest taste choice when compared to miso. Both foods are rich in nutrition, although soy sauce has more salt than miso.

Disadvantages

The downside of using soy sauce instead of miso is that soy sauce is a liquid substance, while miso is a paste. This implies that it may not work well as a substitute for certain recipes, but it works well for dishes like sauces and soups where uniformity isn’t as crucial. Because soy sauce contains a lot of sodium, it’s better to avoid it if you’re on a low sodium diet.

Nutritional breakdown

Soy sauce

Amount (per 100 g)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

53 kcal

3%

Total fat

0.6 g

0.7%

Saturated fat

0.1 g

0.7%

Cholesterol

0

0%

Protein

8 g

16%

Salt

5493 mg

289%

Carbohydrates

5 g

2%

Calcium

33 mg

3%

Iron

1 mg

5%

Potassium

435 mg

11%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


2. TamarišŸŒ±

Soups, marinades, dumplings, noodles, and fish are all excellent candidates.

Tamari is a liquid component produced during the miso-making process. Because it is thicker than soy sauce, it is ideal for preparing dipping sauces.

It also has a more balanced taste than soy sauce and is vegan and gluten-free for individuals on restricted diets. Tamari may be used to your favorite dish directly out of the bottle to add umami, salt, and nutrition.

Advantages

When it comes to dipping sauces, tamari beats miso because the salt is less obvious. It’s also easy to use since you squeeze it from a bottle over anything from tofu to noodles, seafood, or dumplings. Tamari has a deep taste that is more mellow than soy-based miso substitutes. The thickness improves the body that is found in miso.

Disadvantages

No ingredient chosen as a replacement will be flawless, and this applies to tamari as well as the other options on this list. While it is thicker than soy sauce, it is still a liquid, so it will not have the same texture and feel as miso. When purchasing bottled tamari, be in mind that many of them contain an excessive amount of salt. This might be an issue for those who try to minimize their salt consumption.

Nutritional breakdown

Tamari

Amount (per 100 ml)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

33 kcal

2%

Total fat

0 g

0%

Saturated fat

0 g

0%

Cholesterol

0 g

0%

Protein

0 g

0%

Salt

3067 mg

161%

Carbohydrates

7 g

3%

Calcium

0 mg

0%

Iron

0 mg

0%

Potassium

0 mg

0%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


3. Tahini pastešŸŒ±

Salad, hummus, turkey, gyros, and yogurt are the best combinations.

Tahini is a paste made from crushed sesame seeds that may be used in place of miso. It is a popular food in many parts of the world, particularly the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

This gluten-free, vegan miso alternative is simple to make on your own. It has a nutty taste that is unique from miso, which many people love. Store-bought variants, which are often made with hulled sesame seeds, are also available.

Advantages

When you use tahini paste, you obtain a product that looks and functions similarly to miso. When it comes to the visual element of tahini paste and how it mixes in recipes, there aren’t many other alternatives that provide the same level of authenticity. Those who appreciate a creamy and nutty taste will likely prefer this product over alternative substitutes, which are often savory and saltier than tahini paste.

Disadvantages

Tahini paste may resemble miso in appearance, but it does not taste the same. If you anticipate the same flavor profile, you may be disappointed when the paste tastes more like a light peanut butter. This implies that if your recipe calls for a considerable quantity of miso, this may not be the substitute to attempt.

Nutritional breakdown

Tahini paste

Amount (per 100 g)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

3 kcal

0%

Total fat

54 g

65%

Saturated fat

8 g

53%

Cholesterol

0 g

0%

Protein

17 g

33%

Salt

115 mg

6%

Carbohydrates

21 g

8%

Calcium

426 mg

43%

Iron

9 mg

47%

Potassium

414 mg

10%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


4. Salt

Curry, broths, stocks, soups, and French fries are ideal.

If all you want is the salty flavor that miso adds to the table, you may keep things simple by substituting salt. Miso, like other soy sauces, provides a significant quantity of salt to brighten a meal.

While many tastes are employed in miso, individuals looking for a simple replacement may go for salt. It’s a cheap option, and you probably have a salt shaker or two in your kitchen that you can use for a fast supper.

Advantages

Those looking for a fast replacement could use salt instead of miso. Adding salt to a meal takes just seconds and may add a lot of flavor to whatever you’re cooking. Sea salt flakes may be used in a variety of foods and can add a little zing to your cuisine when you have visitors around for supper.

Disadvantages

Many individuals will discover that substituting salt for miso results in a less flavorful meal. This may be a disappointing alternative unless you prefer a solitary salt taste in your curries, stocks, and other recipes. It’s also not the ideal option for those managing their salt consumption.

Nutritional breakdown

Salt

Amount (per 100 g)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

0 kcal

0%

Total fat

0 g

0%

Saturated fat

0 g

0%

Cholesterol

0 g

0%

Protein

0 g

0%

Salt

39333 mg

2070%

Carbohydrates

0 g

0%

Calcium

0 mg

0%

Iron

0 mg

0%

Potassium

0 mg

0%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


5. Vegetable stockšŸŒ±

Soups, couscous, veggies, pasta, and risotto go well with it.

Vegetable stock is another miso substitute that may be used in particular recipes. Vegetable stock is a thin liquid made from mushrooms, carrots, herbs, onions, celery, and parsley.

Making homemade vegetable stock is as simple as cutting veggies, covering them with water, and letting them simmer. Vegetable stock is also available in grocery shops, which is more convenient and may save time.

Advantages

If you want to make a soup with a tiny bit of miso, vegetable stock has the proper texture to mix right in. Although miso is a paste, the liquid from the vegetable stock will not be an issue in a soup or other preparation such as a stew. It also provides a fantastic vegetable flavor and has less salt than miso.

Disadvantages

While vegetable stock may be used in place of miso in certain recipes, it does not work in most others. The flavor is not the same as miso, and the liquid consistency might be an issue if you need something to thicken.

Nutritional breakdown

Vegetable stock

Amount (per 100 g)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

6 kcal

0.3%

Total fat

0 g

0%

Saturated fat

0 g

0%

Cholesterol

0 mg

0%

Protein

0 g

0%

Salt

238 mg

13%

Carbohydrates

1 g

0.4%

Fiber

0 g

0%

Vitamin A

0 ug

0%

Vitamin E

0 ug

0%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


6.Ā Fish sauceĀ 

Stir fry, curries, sauces, pho, and dressings work well.

A fish sauce is a miso replacement produced from salt and fermented anchovies. It is often used in Asia and may improve the flavor of a savory food while also raising the degree of fragrance. It contains the umami that works well with Asian cuisine and other savory recipes you want to prepare as a miso alternative.

Advantages

In comparison to miso, fish sauce is a more handy alternative since it is available in most health food stores and supermarkets. Furthermore, it is often less costly than miso, allowing you to purchase it on a budget. Because fish sauce does not include grains, it is suitable for individuals who do not eat gluten and are not vegetarians or vegans. While the taste isn’t exactly the same as fish sauce, it’s close enough to function in many scenarios.

Disadvantages

Fish sauce has a lot of salt, as you can see from the nutritional breakdown. Anyone managing their salt intake will most likely choose a different replacement. It is also not vegan, therefore individuals who do not eat fish should choose a different miso substitute.

Nutritional breakdown

Fish sauce

Amount (per 100 ml)

% Recommended daily intake

Calories

100 kcal

5%

Total fat

0 g

0%

Saturated fat

0 g

0%

Cholesterol

0 g

0%

Protein

0 g

0%

Salt

7600 mg

400%

Carbohydrates

0 g

0%

Fiber

0 g

0%

Vitamin A

0 ug

0%

Vitamin E

0 ug

0%

(Based on nutritional information from USDA.)


The Bottom Line

Miso is a popular ingredient in many cuisines, yet it is not often seen in most people’s kitchens. If you’re short of miso or want to try something similar, the myriad miso alternatives available give lots of possibilities.

None of these substitutes will be exactly the same as miso, but some will come close. Others are perfect for trying something new.

Top vegan picks

Many vegan miso substitutes are available, so you have a number of options. In terms of suggestions, soy sauce or tahini paste are likely to be the best choices.

Soy sauce is handy since most people have it in their kitchen already. While tahini paste is not widely available, it works well in soups that call for just a tiny quantity of miso. Tamari is a versatile substitute that may be used in a variety of dishes.

Top healthy picks

When it comes to miso substitutes, vegetable stock and tahini paste are the healthiest alternatives. Stocks with less salt offer a lot of minerals and might be good for your health.

Tahini paste is another good alternative since it is high in nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. It doesn’t contain a lot of calories, fat, or salt, so it’s a great healthy option for miso.

Top convenient picks

When searching for a miso substitution, salt is the best option since it is most likely existing in your kitchen. Simply mix some into your recipe and proceed with the remaining stages. You may also use store-bought vegetable stock instead of salt, which is still the best choice.

Top convincing picks

Every ingredient is unique, and none can completely match the benefits of miso. However, some have the ability to replicate the texture or taste of miso and will be the most similar to what you are searching for. Tamari and soy sauce are two of the greatest options in terms of flavor.

Sources:

health-benefits-misoguidehowtowww.bbcgoodfood.comhttps:

is-soy-sauce-bad-for-younutritionwww.healthline.comhttps:

what-is-tamari-3376809www.thespruceeats.comhttps:

FAQs

What is the best replacement for miso?

The soy sauce

What is the best miso substitute? Soy sauce. In a pinch, soy sauce may stand in for the salty and savory taste of miso. Keep in mind, however, that miso paste has a creamy texture, while soy sauce is extremely thin, nearly like water.

What is a substitute for white miso in a recipe?

Tahini. Tahini is the greatest alternative for white miso in terms of consistency and color. Tahini may be used in a 1:1 ratio with miso paste. To replicate the saltiness of true white miso paste, you will need to add soy sauce, tamari, or salt to the tahini.

What is the same as miso?

Soybean paste, a fermented bean paste, may be used in place of miso paste in a variety of cuisines. It’s a popular spice in stews, soups, and even dipping sauces. This paste may be used in place of red miso paste, but bear in mind that it is rather salty.

What is the healthiest form of miso?

White is the best option if you want to avoid salt. If you don’t need to limit your salt consumption, the most healthy color is red. According to the website, White Miso relaxes you and helps you sleep well.

What is a dupe for miso paste?

savoury hit.
Salt. If a recipe only asks for a little quantity of miso and has lots of other ingredients, a pinch of salt may suffice.
Tahini.
Stock made from vegetables.
umami fish sauce Substitutes for Miso Paste
Sauce de Soja. If I run out of miso paste, I turn to soy sauce, which has a similar salty flavor.

What are the different options of miso?

In well-stocked supermarkets, you’ll find three types of miso: White miso, also known as shiro miso, is the mildest and is also known as sweet or mellow miso. The most pungent miso is red miso, which has fermented the longest. Yellow miso, or shinshu miso, is in the center and, according to some, the most adaptable.

Why do Japanese eat miso?

Miso is a traditional Japanese cuisine that has been part of the Japanese diet for over 1,300 years. While it is a traditional Japanese spice, it is also a fermented meal produced by the action of microorganisms.

What is the secret ingredient in miso paste?

The secret component is Aspergillus oryzae, a grain-loving fungus that appears like a delicate flower on a stalk under the microscope. Miso paste, a mainstay of Japanese cuisine, is made by fermenting soybeans, grain, and salt.

What kind of miso paste do Japanese restaurants use?

Red miso, also known as ‘aka miso’ in Japanese, is fermented for a longer period of time than white and yellow miso, giving it a more powerful taste. It also has a larger amount of soybeans than other types of miso. Red miso is often used in the preparation of miso soup, particularly in Japanese restaurants.

Is there a miso paste without soy?

Chickpea Miso MasterĀ® Organic Miso paste is made using garbanzo beans (chickpeas) rather than soybeans. Because it is soy-free, folks on limited diets owing to soy allergies may enjoy the numerous health advantages of miso.

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